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Why Estate Planning Law? A Law Student's Perspective

By: Michael Bezoian | Law Clerk


Most law students start law school without knowing what area of law they want to practice once they become lawyers. “Law” is such a vast concept with historical foundations spanning thousands of years and encompassing virtually every aspect of our lives, so how could a law student reasonably know what he wants to practice? 


Normally, law students gravitate towards a practice area based on their own interests. These interests often exist in law students before they start law school, but it is only through law school that those interests manifest. And yet, some students, find themselves unsure of what they want to practice even after they have completed law school. Committing to a practice area is not a permanent decision, but it is a significant one that warrants serious thought and consideration. 


Having described the landscape that law students face, the question that follows is why, I, a law student who just completed his first year of law school, find myself in the minority of law students who have “committed” themselves to a practice area. Furthermore, of all the areas of law, why estate planning? 

The answer is simple when one considers the foundation of estate planning: asset management. Fundamentally, estate planning is the law concerning succession of one’s assets to another, whether the parties involved are family members, friends, or charitable causes. 


How could that not be interesting? Especially interesting about the transactional aspect of estate planning is drafting up documents that allow for asset management all while ensuring that the client’s wishes are fulfilled in their entirety both now and in the future. The challenge of drafting such documents and ensuring that they accurately represent the client’s wishes and that they will continue to do so years down the road is captivating. Doubly captivating is that a lawyer is entrusted to see all of this through. 


More appealing than the substantive law, however, are the relationships that form from good legal representation. Whether it is helping clients form businesses or drafting documents for the clients, the opportunities to interact and form a personal relationship with the client are almost endless. There are few things more satisfying than knowing that you were given a complex problem and that you solved it while remaining entirely faithful to the client’s wishes. 


Though I know people’s interests vary, sometimes I wonder how my law student peers are not totally fascinated by this area of law considering how interesting, rewarding, and important it is. It is a debate I have yet to win, but it does not mean I won’t stop trying! 


Michael is a rising 2L at the University of Wisconsin Law School. Originally from Los Angeles, California, Michael chose to attend law school in Wisconsin partly because of the wonderful people, Midwestern culture, and, of course, the fried cheese curds. In his spare time, Michael enjoys learning about blockchain technology and Thomistic philosophy.


Michael has joined the G&C team as a Law Clerk for the Summer of 2020, working closely with Attorneys Christoffersen and Lagman. We look forward to working with Michael and sharing our love of cheese curds. For more information on available opportunities at Grams & Christoffersen, please email info@dfgrams.com


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The lawyers and accountants of Grams & Christoffersen, S.C. serve clients in the Madison area and in western and central Wisconsin including, Madison, Middleton, Fitchburg, Stoughton, Janesville, Oregon, Sun Prairie, Lodi, Fort Atkinson, Dodgeville, Highland, Mount Horeb, Monroe, Beaver Dam, Muscoda, Prairie du Sac, Merrimac, Baraboo, Richland Center, Poynette, Jefferson, Lake Mills, and Dane County and surrounding counties, Columbia County, Sauk County, Iowa County, Green County, and Rock County, Richland County, Dodge County, Jefferson County.